Welcome to SylviaMcGrath.net


Welcome to my blog where I discuss the things I am most passionate about. I am following a long time dream of mine to be freelance writer; writing for and about children with chronic illness, special needs and learning challenges.  I am also a published author, poet and literacy tutor living in King City, Ontario.

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October 2017 Awareness  Month ~ National Breast Cancer ~


 

October ~ National Breast Cancer

Awareness  Month
A perfect time to have mammogram

All women are at risk of getting breast cancer and as you age your risk increases. On average, one in seven women will get breast cancer over a 90-year life span.
Breast cancer is a growth or irregular cells within the breast. It is not a one disease, but a group of diseases that can develop in any of the ducts, which carry milk to the nipple.
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women and its cause is unknown. Every dollar Canadians donate to research brings us one step closer to discovering the causes of breast cancer, better methods to prevent and detect it, treatments that are more effective and improving the quality of life for survivors.

Canadian Breast Cancer statistic ~ 2017

  • U.S. Breast Cancer Statistics | Breastcancer.org
    www.breastcancer.org  … › Understanding Breast Cancer
    U.S. Breast Cancer Statistics. About 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. In 2017, an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 63,410 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

~~~~

  •  Breast cancer statistics – Canadian Cancer Society
    www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/breast/statistics/…
    26,300 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. This represents 25% of all new cancer cases in women in 2017. 5,000 women will die from breast cancer. This represents 13% of all cancer deaths in women in 2017. On average, 72 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every day.

~~~~

  • 1 in 9 women is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime (age 90)
    and  1 in 20 will die from it.
  • It is expected that 220 men will be diagnosed with breast  cancer and  60  will  die
  • Thanks to improvements in screening, detection and treatment the 5 year survival rate for men is 80% and 88% for women. Research is making a difference
  • Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s.
  • This is most likely due to increased awareness, organized breast screening programs and improvements in treatment.
  • Risk Factors for Breast Cancer.
  • Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.
  • Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:
  • Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women.
  • Age – risk increases as you get older.
  • Having a personal breast cancer history.
  • Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer.
  • Early menstruation (before age 12)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy.
  • Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
  • Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)
  • Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:
  • Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day.
  • Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection.
  • Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health.
  • Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer.

Source: Canadian Cancer Society Updated 06/2015
Sunnybrook hospital in Toronto has a special clinical and research clinic that is focused on the needs of younger women with breast cancer.
To learn more visit http://rethinkbreastcancer.com/

Research also indicates that these patients long for more peer support, assistance within the treatment system and information on issues specific to them, such as early menopause, fertility and breast reconstruction.

All women are different, so are their breasts. If you experience anything unusual for you, consult your doctor immediately.
The most common sign of breast cancer is a lump, mass or thickening of the breast tissue. Some women report sensitivity in this area. Other problems may include pain, bleeding or other discharge from the nipple, changes in breast shape, generalized swelling of the entire breast, or the irritation or dimpling of the breast skin

Discuss with your doctor before starting any drug therapy, as treatments for breast cancer are very individual.

In Canada the best places to go for a mammogram is at the Provincial Screening Centers. A screening mammogram is the quickest, safest and easiest way to find out if there is a problem. At these centers, they will also show you how to perform a self-breast examination.

Service:

They aim to provide the best possible experience for those that deal with us, whether they are young adults using our programs, donors supporting our programs or volunteers helping in any variety of ways. It is paramount these stakeholders have a positive experience and our duty to ensure it.

Mortality:

Mortality refers to the number of people that are likely to die from breast cancer in a population over a period of time.  Mortality rates can help us understand the impact that breast cancer has on society based on the number of lives lost to the disease. They also provide insight into the effectiveness of treatments.  High incidence rates and low mortality rates suggest that while a significant number of people are being diagnosed with a disease, many are surviving due to effective treatments.

Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

American Breast Cancer Statistic ~ 2013.

About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013
Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.
About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013
Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems
Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s.

Risk Factors for Breast Cancer
Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two
risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.
Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:
Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women.

Age – risk increases as you get older:
Having a personal breast cancer history
Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer.
Early menstruation (before age 12)
Late menopause (after age 55)
Taking hormone replacement therapy
Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)
Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:
Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day
Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection
Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health
Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Statistics Worldwide
“In 2010, nearly 1.5 million people were told “you have breast cancer”
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. It is also the principle cause of death from cancer among women globally. Despite the high incidence rates, in Western countries, 89% of women diagnosed with breast cancer are still alive 5 years after their diagnosis, which is due to detection and treatment (Parkin, 2008).
The UK and USA have one of the highest incidence rates worldwide (together with the rest of North America and Australia/New Zealand), making these countries a priority for breast cancer awareness. View the map below to see how your country is impacted by breast cancer (pink being the highest per capita):

 Dramatically, one-third of these cancer deaths could be decreased if detected and treated early. In a worldwide context, this means nearly 400,000 lives could be saved every year.*
The World Health Organisation [WHO] has suggested that two components of early detection have been shown to improve cancer mortality
Education—to help people recognize early signs of cancer and seek prompt medical attention for symptoms.
Screening programs—to identify early cancer or pre-cancer before signs are recognizable, including mammography for breast cancer.
If  you require any further information ~ Please contact the links below or your countries
Canadian Breast Cancer Society
https://www.cancer.ca/en


American Cancer Foundation
www.cancer.org/
Cancer Research UK – Official Sites.
http://icgc.org/icg
https://www.cancerresearchuk.org
Breast cancer statistics | World Cancer Research Fund International
www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-specific-cancers/breast-cancer-statistics

Posted in Health Awareness Months | Leave a comment

The Benefits Of Keeping A Journal


Write Daily in your journal.

Writing morning pages is a way of discovering or re-discovering the inconspicuous things that would otherwise slip below our radar

I was introduced to keeping a journal when I was about twelve years old. My great, great Aunt had passed away and left a copy of a journal written by an ancestor of mine dated 1879. Her name was Sophia Hendricks and each page was hand written with ink and nib pen. Her handwriting was perfect; her daily entries were on her observations of life, inspirational and religious books she had read. Accompanying her writing were pictures she had cut from postcards, greeting cards, etc. each covered with tissue paper to protect them.

I was so excited with the book. It has been a treasured possession of mine for many years. I tried to copy Sophia’s style. It has been read by me so many times over the years, that the pages are turning yellow and is in need of  being rebound has a few pages have become loose with wear.

The book was such an inspiration to me that I just had to keep a journal, and I kept up with the daily entries until I was sixteen. I had written a love poem about my boyfriend at the time. Then some family members got hold of it and proceeded to read it aloud. I never wrote anything personal in it for quite some time.

Over the years, I used it for goal setting and visualization of dreams and found it very beneficial.

Due to Arthritis and Depression, it became necessary for me to take an early retirement. It was then, that I decided to follow one of those dreams. That was to be a writer.

I took several courses and read many books, such as Julia Cameron’s “The Artists Way” in which she suggests that to improve our writing; writers should write three morning pages a day. This was to allow one to get the creative juices flowing, and the muddled thought out of our heads.

Writing these pages is a way of discovering or re-discovering the inconspicuous things that would otherwise slip below our radar. I found that writing the three morning pages also allowed me to work through some of the problems that had led to my depression and would suggest to anyone the benefit outweighs the time they take.

The idea is to write them first thing in the morning, I usually have my coffee or tea and my breakfast. By then I can focus on both my feeling and my writing,

To start keeping a journal you will need, a notebook. I try to find ones that look extra nice, not just a doodle book. One that can make me take this seriously. I then look for a nice pen; my daughter and I love to use a fountain pen. You will also need of course a good writing surface. If you want to keep your journal on your computer, some programs are available on-line. The following is one I have tried and is quite good.

http://www.freedownloadscenter.com/Utilities/Misc__Utilities/Smart_Diary_Download.htm

flexible and you can create your own or download additional “Life Factor” packs.The diary features uses unique Life Factors that allows you to see how different aspects of your life affect your health and happiness, by plotting them on a graph, showing how exercise and diet affects your mood. They are completely

When writing a journal this is something personal, there are no rules about writing in your journal; you can write about whatever, whoever, and whenever you want.

You can write in it every day, week, month whenever you feel you would like to express yourself. Write whatever is important to you. There is no set time to write this is a very personal thing. You can use your special book, plain or lined paper, write with pen or pencil. Type your entries or just use a digital version like the one above.

Some people like me use their journal to help set long-time goals. Others use it to help focus on their thoughts.  When they are put down on paper this helps with the understanding of them. If one is angry or confused writing the problem down in a journal, helps get it out and the understanding of your feelings. A Journal can also be used to help people explore their inner lives to improve their psychophysical health as I did when trying to understand my depression.

Keeping a journal is your story your feeling and life experience; it can improve one’s well being spiritually, emotionally and physically. It is finding and taking personal time for one’s self. It is a record of your life, a treasured keepsake a written scrapbook. When we list our daily thoughts and problems sometimes as we read it back we can see a positive side, and we see the things we should be grateful for.

The information you write could also be used to keep a family history journal that can be handed down to future generations.

Over the centuries there have been several journals  written by famous people such as Ann Frank, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Wolf, George Washington to name a few.

Please let me have your comments and ideas, I will write a follow-up blog and include some of them in it.

Far away in the sunshine are my highest aspirations. I may
not reach them, but I can look up and see their beauty,
believe in them, and try to follow where they lead.
Louisa May Alcott

Posted in Living Ones Life with Passion | 5 Comments

Spring arrived on March 20th.,2017


Robin

The Coming of Spring

By Sylvia W. McGrath

Daffodiles1

Spring is here again I see,

and many a bud do I see on the tree.

I love the soft notes of the birds that sing,

I love the sweet smell the daffodils bring.

Tulips in bold colours of yellow pink and red,

Brighten-up that dreary old flower bed.

The Robin arrives wearing his red vest,

and in the old oak tree builds his nest.

The cuckoo is on his way.

To do damage or just to play?

The coming of spring fills the air with fresh hope

And in the most stressful lives we feel we can cope

Tulips

Posted in Writing and Poetry by Sylvia W McGrath | Leave a comment

Madi’s Story told by here mother ~ Katherine Ambos


Madi’s Story ~ told by her Mother ~ Katherine Ambos

Our baby girl, Madison, was born three years ago.  She arrived early at 32 weeks. We enjoyed those early months. But at the age of six months we realized she wasn’t meeting her milestones for gross motor skills. Then, after her first birthday, following a battery of tests we received the devastating news. Madi has Cerebral Palsy (CP).

Madi will be a Villager for life.  As she calls it, it’s her second home.  It’s also the place where I have had many joyful life experiences, and have always felt at home.

My first experience with Variety Village was when I was four.  We lived in the neighbourhood.  My mother was a special education teacher who often brought her classes to the Village for adapted fitness programs for kids with disabilities. She loved the inclusive, integrated philosophy and soon realized that there was something for everyone with or without disabilities. So she introduced me and my brother to Variety Village.

Over the years we participated in Children in Motion, a unique program focusing on the fundamentals of play; we had Red Cross swim lessons, and attended summer camps. My entire childhood and teenage years involved working and volunteering with children and adults with disabilities and sparked my passion for teaching so, like my mother, I took the path to become a special education teacher.

After graduating, I returned to Variety to work part-time in programs. That’s when I met my husband. James was a long-time member of Variety Village and was giving back by volunteering with the Sunshine Swim Team – a team for swimmers with developmental disabilities.

Having grown up alongside people with disabilities, James and I always said if we had a child with a disability, we would be prepared. We were wrong. We really didn’t know what we were doing in the beginning but, we didn’t see Madi’s “disability” as a barrier, and we clearly understood we needed to provide her with all the help we could give her. It gives me some peace to know Variety Village will be part of Madi’s journey moving forward.  I couldn’t imagine her life without the Village.

I watch Madi as she swims in the pool with her instructor Ryan or 16 year old Flames Team swimmer, Jessica. Because Jessica also has CP, she and Madi have created a unique bond. Madi loves the water and has become a little fish. Swimming has eased Madi’s leg pain, made her happy and helped her sleep better at night. She is happy with her accomplishments and new-found confidence and she is working hard in the hope she will one day swim on the Flames team like Jessica. More importantly, I see that Madi is proud of herself.

I laugh as Madi zooms around the fieldhouse with her walker or climbs the obstacle course in her Children in Motion program. It comforts me to know she will receive expert instruction and physiotherapy and that she will see her entire family participating in programs together – Madi has a little brother now; Jack, who is nine months old.

I’m grateful we have a place like Variety Village. Our children are accepted, safe, comfortable, and included at their “second home.”  Madison and all the kids’ like her need your support. Variety Village is essential in the lives of so many children and families.

Sincerely,

Katherine Ambos

Posted in Inspirational Stories | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month ~ October 2016


nbcf-logo

October is Awareness  Month

National Breast Cancer

A perfect time to have mammogram

All women are at risk of getting breast cancer and as you age your risk increases. On average, one in seven women will get breast cancer over a 90-year life span.

Breast cancer is a growth or irregular cells within the breast. It is not a one disease, but a Brgroup of diseases that can develop in any of the ducts, which carry milk to the nipple.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women and its cause is unknown. Every dollar Canadians donate to research brings us one step closer to discovering the causes of breast cancer, better methods to prevent and detect it, treatments that are more effective and improving the quality of life for survivors.

Canadian Breast Cancer statistic ~ 2015

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women and its cause is known.

We truly believe that every dollar Canadians donate to research brings us one step closer to discovering the causes of breast cancer, better methods to prevent and detect it, treatments that are more effective and improving the quality of life for survivors.

In 2015 an estimated 25,000 Canadian women were  diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,000 will die from it.

  •     Approximately 68 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every day
  •     Approximately 14 Canadian women will die of breast cancer every day.
  •    1 in 9 women is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime (age 90)
  •    and  1 in 20 will die from it.
  •     It is expected that 220 men will be diagnosed with breast  cancer and  60  will  die   

Thanks to improvements in screening, detection and treatment the 5 year survival rate for men is 80% and 88% for women. Research is making a difference!

Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s.

This is most likely due to increased awareness, organized breast screening programs and improvements in treatment.

 Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.

Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:

  • Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women
  • Age – risk increases as you get older
  • Having a personal breast cancer history
  • Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer
  • Early menstruation (before age 12)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy
  • Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
  • Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)

Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:

  • Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day
  • Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection
  • Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health
  • Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer

Source: Canadian Cancer Society Updated 06/2015

Sunnybrook hospital in Toronto has a special clinical and research clinic that is focused on the needs of younger women with breast cancer.

To learn more visit http://rethinkbreastcancer.com/

Research also indicates that these patients long for more peer support, assistance within the treatment system and information on issues specific to them, such as early menopause, fertility and breast reconstruction.

All women are different, so are their breasts. If you experience anything unusual for you, consult your doctor immediately.

The most common sign of breast cancer is a lump, mass or thickening of the breast tissue. Some women report sensitivity in this area. Other problems may include pain, bleeding or other discharge from the nipple, changes in breast shape, generalized swelling of the entire breast, or the irritation or dimpling of the breast skin

Discuss with your doctor before starting any drug therapy, as treatments for breast cancer are very individual.

In Canada the best places to go for a mammogram is at the Provincial Screening Centers. A screening mammogram is the quickest, safest and easiest way to find out if there is a problem. At these centers, they will also show you how to perform a self-breast examination.

Service: They aim to provide the best possible experience for those that deal with us, whether they are young adults using our programs, donors supporting our programs or volunteers helping in any variety of ways. It is paramount these stakeholders have a positive experience and our duty to ensure it.

Mortality:

Mortality refers to the number of people that are likely to die from breast cancer in a population over a period of time.  Mortality rates can help us understand the impact that breast cancer has on society based on the number of lives lost to the disease. They also provide insight into the effectiveness of treatments.  High incidence rates and low mortality rates suggest that while a significant number of people are being diagnosed with a disease, many are surviving due to effective treatments.

Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

American Breast Cancer Statistic ~ 2013.

About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013

Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013

Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems

Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s

Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two

risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.

Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:

  • Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women
  • Age – risk increases as you get older
  • Having a personal breast cancer history
  • Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer
  • Early menstruation (before age 12)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy
  • Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
  • Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)

Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:

  • Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day
  • Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection
  • Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health
  • Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer.

       Breast Cancer Statistics Worldwide

In 2010, nearly 1.5 million people were told “you have breast cancer”

 Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. It is also the principle cause of death from cancer among women globally. Despite the high incidence rates, in Western countries, 89% of women diagnosed with breast cancer are still alive 5 years after their diagnosis, which is due to detection and treatment (Parkin, 2008).

The UK and USA have one of the highest incidence rates worldwide (together with the rest of North America and Australia/New Zealand), making these countries a priority for breast cancer awareness. View the map below to see how your country is impacted by breast cancer (pink being the highest per capita):

breastcancerstatsworldwide-660x447

 Dramatically, one-third of these cancer deaths could be decreased if detected and treated early. In a worldwide context, this means nearly 400,000 lives could be saved every year.*

The World Health Organisation [WHO] has suggested that two components of early detection have been shown to improve cancer mortality

  • Education—to help people recognize early signs of cancer and seek prompt medical attention for symptoms.
  • Screening programs—to identify early cancer or pre-cancer before signs are recognizable, including mammography for breast cancer.

If  you require any further information ~ Please contact the links below or your countries

Canadian Breast Cancer Society

https://www.cancer.ca/en

American Cancer Foundation

http://www.cancer.org/

Cancer Research UK – Official Sites.

http://icgc.org/icg

https://http://www.cancerresearchuk.org

Breast cancer statistics | World Cancer Research Fund International

http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-specific-cancers/breastcancer-statistics

 

Posted in Health Awareness Months | Leave a comment

Autumn Grizzly in Banff National Park — Discover


Photographer Christopher Martin captures a grizzly bear — stark against fall color in Banff National Park. via Autumn Grizzly in Banff National Park — Discover

Source: Autumn Grizzly in Banff National Park — Discover

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Writingmama’ s Inspirational Thoughts for September 2016


How many of us do take life for granted?

Source: Writingmama’ s Inspirational Thoughts for September 2016

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Interview with Author Mari L. McCarthy of @CreateWriteNow~Interviewed by bwitzenhausen September 22nd. 2016


Posted by bwitzenhausen

mari-l-mcarthy

I am thrilled to  interview Mari L. McCarthy, Founder and Chief Inspiration Officer of CreateWriteNow and discuss her new book Journaling Power! Welcome Mari! 

 journaling-power

 

Please tell us a bit about yourself and your new book Journaling Power.

I’m the Founder and Chief Inspiration Officer of CreateWriteNow.com. It’s also known as The Journaling Power Center: I show people how to use the ultimate holistic health tool–Journaling, to heal, grow and transform themselves. I’ve authored 18 Journaling Power eWorkbooks and created numerous Journaling Power Challenges on topics ranging from Love Your Body to Life Transitions to Spirituality.

I began journaling 18 years ago to deal with a Multiple Sclerosis (MS) symptom flare-up that had caused me to lose most feeling and function on my body’s right side.  I needed a “procedure” (I was a left brain controlled businesswoman) to teach myself how to write with my left hand, like, yesterday. A hypnotherapist suggested Julia Cameron’s “Morning Pages” and I was off. But I soon discovered that my daily pen-to-paper writing therapy practice helped me improve not only my physical health but my psychological and spiritual health as well. I’ve realized many other benefits from this awesome self-healing tool like reconnecting with my creativity, my wisdom and my personal power.

In Journaling Power: How To Create The Happy, Healthy Life You Want To Live I’ve written a self-help memoir that shares my experiences of how I’m using Journaling to heal my diseases and also gives my readers everything (including challenging exercises) they need to set up and keep a Journaling Power Practice.

What was the inspiration behind Journaling Power?

I often get what I call “universal messages” in my Journal and one day, “Journaling Power” came up and later the message, “now is the time to write the book that must be written.” Then I started using my Journal to help me find resources to mentor me as I’d never written a “real” book before.

What does your average work/writing day look like?

First thing after showering, I do my ambidextrous Morning Pages, breakfast (I’m a pesca-vegetarian and eat only non-processed food, thanks to Journaling). Then log onto my computer and do 250-500 words in my Daily Page account. Then onto writing blog posts and other writing projects. In the afternoon, I meet with clients and finish the day with a page of Night Notes which helps me express my gratitudes and turn off the brain so I can enjoy a night of healing

sleep and dreams.

What are some of the biggest challenges you face as a writer and how do you overcome them?

I’d say my biggest challenge is me. I’m so experienced at self-sabotage etc. I find the best thing for dealing with my “issues” is to keep to my routine Monday through Friday and make my weekends for me, my inner kids, singer and artist only.

What message do you hope your readers walk away with after reading your book?

That they have the power, creativity, wisdom and intelligence to create the life that they want to live. That they have a free therapist in their Journal that will help them to eliminate the baggage they’ve been carrying around since childhood, reconnect with their true self (the one they came into this life with!) and live, love and laugh. A lot.

Can you tell us what is coming up for you and where can we find you online?

My Journal and I are discussing my next self-help memoir, Thinking With My Heart (working title). It looks like it’ll focus on healing our physical diseases and becoming our own healthcare advocate/provider, partnering with healthcare professionals to reduce doctor visits and drugs and become and stay healthier longer.

I’m at www.CreateWriteNow.com.

 

Posted in Re-post of interviews by Posted by bwitzenhausen | Leave a comment

Interview with Author Laurie Buchanan PhD ( @TuesWithLaurie ) — IgniteYourCreativity.net by Belinda Witzenhausen ~ Re-Blogged fr0m Belinda Witzenhausen


I am thrilled to have the opportunity to interview holistic health practitioner, coach and author Laurie Buchanan PhD. Welcome Laurie! Please tell us a bit about yourself and your new book, Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth Board certified by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, I’m a holistic health practitioner […]

via Interview with Author Laurie Buchanan PhD ( @TuesWithLaurie ) — IgniteYourCreativity.net by Belinda Witzenhausen

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Sylvia’s Monthly Book Review ~ June 22, 2016


A Discovery of Witches:

A Novel (All Souls Trilogy, Book 1)

By Deborah Harkness (Author)

 

A Discovery of Witchesf

A richly inventive novel about a centuries-old vampire, a spellbound witch, and the mysterious manuscript that draws them together. 

Deep in the stacks of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

I found ” A Discovery of Witches” to be a fresh, intelligent, rich, and detailed re-imagining of our mundane world to include four kinds of people: humans and the so-called “creatures” known as vampires, witches, and daemons, where interrelations between the “creature” species is forbidden by an ancient Covenant.

The tale has the intellectual, detective aspects as found in the DaVinci Code  It has the political and strategic aspects of a complex chess game, with creatures poised on the brink of war placing their pieces in complex plans and stratagems. It tells the story of a deep, forbidden love between an ancient vampire and a witch of great power, a love that is tested by those who would stop at nothing to preserve the ancient Covenant and possess the witch’s power.

The book has the feeling of a classic epic: rich in depth, complexity, and detail, all of which are interwoven into a larger tapestry which we can only see a small piece of in this novel.

I have now started reading book two in this series “Shadow of Night and find this book just as good if not better than “A Discovery of Witches.”

About the author

Deborah Harkness

Deborah Harkness – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Occupation Scholar, novelist
Nationality American
Education Mount Holyoke College, Northwestern University, University of California at Davis
Genre Fantasy, historical fiction
Notable works A Discovery of Witches
Shadow of Night
The Book of Life
Website       http://www.deborahharkness.com/
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