October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month ~ October 2016

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October is Awareness  Month

National Breast Cancer

A perfect time to have mammogram

All women are at risk of getting breast cancer and as you age your risk increases. On average, one in seven women will get breast cancer over a 90-year life span.

Breast cancer is a growth or irregular cells within the breast. It is not a one disease, but a Brgroup of diseases that can develop in any of the ducts, which carry milk to the nipple.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women and its cause is unknown. Every dollar Canadians donate to research brings us one step closer to discovering the causes of breast cancer, better methods to prevent and detect it, treatments that are more effective and improving the quality of life for survivors.

Canadian Breast Cancer statistic ~ 2015

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women and its cause is known.

We truly believe that every dollar Canadians donate to research brings us one step closer to discovering the causes of breast cancer, better methods to prevent and detect it, treatments that are more effective and improving the quality of life for survivors.

In 2015 an estimated 25,000 Canadian women were  diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,000 will die from it.

  •     Approximately 68 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every day
  •     Approximately 14 Canadian women will die of breast cancer every day.
  •    1 in 9 women is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime (age 90)
  •    and  1 in 20 will die from it.
  •     It is expected that 220 men will be diagnosed with breast  cancer and  60  will  die   

Thanks to improvements in screening, detection and treatment the 5 year survival rate for men is 80% and 88% for women. Research is making a difference!

Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s.

This is most likely due to increased awareness, organized breast screening programs and improvements in treatment.

 Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.

Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:

  • Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women
  • Age – risk increases as you get older
  • Having a personal breast cancer history
  • Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer
  • Early menstruation (before age 12)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy
  • Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
  • Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)

Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:

  • Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day
  • Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection
  • Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health
  • Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer

Source: Canadian Cancer Society Updated 06/2015

Sunnybrook hospital in Toronto has a special clinical and research clinic that is focused on the needs of younger women with breast cancer.

To learn more visit http://rethinkbreastcancer.com/

Research also indicates that these patients long for more peer support, assistance within the treatment system and information on issues specific to them, such as early menopause, fertility and breast reconstruction.

All women are different, so are their breasts. If you experience anything unusual for you, consult your doctor immediately.

The most common sign of breast cancer is a lump, mass or thickening of the breast tissue. Some women report sensitivity in this area. Other problems may include pain, bleeding or other discharge from the nipple, changes in breast shape, generalized swelling of the entire breast, or the irritation or dimpling of the breast skin

Discuss with your doctor before starting any drug therapy, as treatments for breast cancer are very individual.

In Canada the best places to go for a mammogram is at the Provincial Screening Centers. A screening mammogram is the quickest, safest and easiest way to find out if there is a problem. At these centers, they will also show you how to perform a self-breast examination.

Service: They aim to provide the best possible experience for those that deal with us, whether they are young adults using our programs, donors supporting our programs or volunteers helping in any variety of ways. It is paramount these stakeholders have a positive experience and our duty to ensure it.

Mortality:

Mortality refers to the number of people that are likely to die from breast cancer in a population over a period of time.  Mortality rates can help us understand the impact that breast cancer has on society based on the number of lives lost to the disease. They also provide insight into the effectiveness of treatments.  High incidence rates and low mortality rates suggest that while a significant number of people are being diagnosed with a disease, many are surviving due to effective treatments.

Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

American Breast Cancer Statistic ~ 2013.

About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013

Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die in 2013

Although breast cancer is generally a disease for older women, a significant number under the age of forty is rising. Those young women represent only 5% of all breast cancer patients however; most of them are likely to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage of cancer; and more likely to die of their disease. Even if cured, they are more prone to have psychological problems

Noteworthy Trend: Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since the mid 1980s

Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Many factors can impact a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer, however if you have identified one or two

risks please don’t assume you will get breast cancer. Some women who have more than one breast cancer risk never develop breast cancer, and many women (approx. 70%) had no risk factors at all.

Factors which have consistently found to increase your risk of breast cancer:

  • Being a woman – approx. 99% of breast cancers occur in women
  • Age – risk increases as you get older
  • Having a personal breast cancer history
  • Having a close relative (s) with breast cancer
  • Early menstruation (before age 12)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy
  • Delayed childbirth (having a first baby after the age of 30 or never having had a baby)
  • Being overweight after menopause, based on your BMI (body mass index)

Factors which have been less consistently found to increase breast cancer risk:

  • Drinking alcohol – recommendations for cancer control suggest that women drink less than one drink per day
  • Breastfeed- studies are showing that the longer you breastfeed the greater the protection
  • Being physically inactive – exercising for at least 30 minutes, five days per week may help maintain overall health
  • Smoking tobacco and breathing second-hand smoke – increases a woman’s chance of developing several types of cancer including breast cancer.

       Breast Cancer Statistics Worldwide

In 2010, nearly 1.5 million people were told “you have breast cancer”

 Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. It is also the principle cause of death from cancer among women globally. Despite the high incidence rates, in Western countries, 89% of women diagnosed with breast cancer are still alive 5 years after their diagnosis, which is due to detection and treatment (Parkin, 2008).

The UK and USA have one of the highest incidence rates worldwide (together with the rest of North America and Australia/New Zealand), making these countries a priority for breast cancer awareness. View the map below to see how your country is impacted by breast cancer (pink being the highest per capita):

breastcancerstatsworldwide-660x447

 Dramatically, one-third of these cancer deaths could be decreased if detected and treated early. In a worldwide context, this means nearly 400,000 lives could be saved every year.*

The World Health Organisation [WHO] has suggested that two components of early detection have been shown to improve cancer mortality

  • Education—to help people recognize early signs of cancer and seek prompt medical attention for symptoms.
  • Screening programs—to identify early cancer or pre-cancer before signs are recognizable, including mammography for breast cancer.

If  you require any further information ~ Please contact the links below or your countries

Canadian Breast Cancer Society

https://www.cancer.ca/en

American Cancer Foundation

http://www.cancer.org/

Cancer Research UK – Official Sites.

http://icgc.org/icg

https://http://www.cancerresearchuk.org

Breast cancer statistics | World Cancer Research Fund International

http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-specific-cancers/breastcancer-statistics

 

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About writingmama

Sylvia McGrath ~ AKA Writingmama, a freelance writer from King City, Ontario has worked in the business field for about forty years obtaining business management experience and business writing skills. She also spent several years in social work for Children’s Services. Now retired is living her childhood dream of being a writer. A few years ago Sylvia decided to take a course in freelance writing, which she really enjoyed as it was the key to follow her dreams. Since completing the course, she has worked as a professional writer, a published poet and co-authored a book with Two Maximum Life Coaches about living with chronic illness; this is titled After The Diagnosis: The Journey Beyond.” She also co-authored an E-Book of Resources for the parents of children with special needs, chronic illness and learning challenges titled “The Treasure Chest of Resources,” part-one has already been sent to the Canadian National Library Archives. Sylvia has also written several articles on chronic illness for the following online sites. •www.suite101.com/profile.cfm/writingmama •www.helium.com/users/32475 •www.jacketflap.com/profile.asp?member=Writingmom Besides working as a freelance writer, Sylvia still finds time for two other passions of hers; to volunteer as a literacy tutor for her local Learning Centre, and assist in facilitating of workshops on disability awareness. Her main mission for the future is to write a series of books for young adults and children who have learning challenges and suffer chronic illness. At present she is also the co-owner and columnist for “Professor Owl’s Newsletter” which is published on-line monthly for children.
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